When Experiential Marketing Works

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On a trip to Disney World I had the opportunity to take in the Test Track at Epcot and was able to witness experiential marketing at its best.  The Test Track is presented by General Motors’ Chevrolet and involves the design and testing of a virtual concept car.

In the first stage of the pavilion, participants are given an opportunity to design a concept car. They can customize the shape, color, engine, along with several other features.  Participants have a set amount of time to design the vehicle before moving into the next phase.

The ride portion of the test track is where participants test their concept car.  Each vehicle is assigned a code that is loaded to their magic band or Disney card, so when they enter the ride stage, the code can be loaded and used to test their specific vehicle under a number of parameters like capability, efficiency, responsiveness and power.  This is where the fun begins as participants load into a vehicle and go through a series of test tracks.  Once the ride is complete, they receive information on how their concept car performed.

Following the ride, participants can take part in a number of interactive experiences.  They can create commercials for their concept car, take pictures with other Chevy concept vehicles in a showroom and a take part in a digital driving table that allows participants to drive a mini version of their car around a track.

Experiential marketing is all about helping consumers experience a brand. It’s objective is to stimulate as many senses as possible in that experience and to create a memorable and emotional connection between the consumer and the brand.

As I walked through this pavilion and witnessed the excitement on the faces of many of the participants as they tested their concept cars and posed for pictures, it was evident to see that the Chevrolet Test Track is one of the best examples of experiential marketing that I’ve seen.